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Monday, March 19, 2007

How SYSCO is monopolizing foodservice

I've had more friends who know what I do for a living email me this primer on foodservice for the layman than any other. Now even my old Internet buddies know SYSCO from Cisco.

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4 Comments:

do said...

I hardly consider 17.5% of one's market a monopoly. Try researching substantiating what you espouse rather than spewing junk. Is this really the value you choose to provide society?

9:25 PM  
Anonymous said...

Tiger,

This article is not worthy of your re-printing on this blog for a number of reasons.
1) Although there are no innaccuracies in the article, there is a lot of So What. So people buy frozen food and then heat it up. Big Deal. So every restaurant does not make every cake from scratch? Who cares. Restaurants attract (and keep) customers with good food, regardless of where/who it's made. Lots of restaurants are capable of making pure crap in from scratch, does that make them more successful? More relevant? I don;t think so.
2) Secondly, most of us in this community rely a great deal on SYSCO, for good and bad. None of the arguments made in this article mention anything but the food, and the implied notion that if it is in a SYSCO box, it must be bad. Although there are probably some not-so-great items in the lower tier brands, I know there is some great stuff in the Imperial and Supreme brands.
There are many reasons to be afraid of the Blue Box, but not for any of the ones mentioned in this article. It is beneath FSR to re-print such trash.

Sincerely,

Your pal,
Pete

9:31 AM  
Tiger said...

It's an interesting question: Does 17.5% constitute a monopoly?

We often forget that there are hundreds of independent distributors in the marketplace. One by one they don't represent much volume, but if someone could aggregate them into a single incentive and communications program... Well, that would make it easier to recognize and reward their efforts, wouldn't it?

3:16 PM  
Tiger said...

Pete -

As always, appreciate your contributions. The objection is wonderfully articulated (and noted!)

3:57 PM  

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